Organizational Culture

Organizational Culture

The Make-or-Break Factor in Hiring and Retention

Your organization's culture is at the heart of your ability to recruit and retain employees. It's as simple as that.

Download the report to find out:
  • What candidates really look for when researching potential employers
  • How to create buzz about your workplace
  • Questions you should ask to determine a prospective hire's fit with your team
  • Three steps for evaluating whether someone is a good match for your team and company
  • What companies can do so employees stay in love with their jobs

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Download the report to find out:
  • What candidates really look for when researching potential employers
  • How to create buzz about your workplace
  • Questions you should ask to determine a prosective hire's fit with your team
  • Three steps for evaluating whether someone is a good match for your team and company
  • What companies can do so employees stay in love with their jobs

What is organizational culture?

Organizational culture is the unique environment within each company, shaped by the values, perceptions, preferences and behaviors of the people who work there.

Why is organizational culture important?

A toxic workplace hurts employees, but it also damages business by driving away top performers.

On the flip side, a company that inspires and rewards its workers is likely to thrive and create positive buzz. Download this report for more on why company culture matters and what you can do to build a great place to work.

Organizational culture is the new currency for hiring and retention. The true differentiator for our company, as an employer, is our organizational culture — not the pay, benefits or perks that we can offer."
 
— Chuck Edward, head of global talent acquisition, Microsoft

Fit is a two-way street

Workers are unlikely to align themselves with an organization that doesn't share their values. Even if the job were perfect, 35 percent of staff in the U.S. and 40 percent in Canada said they wouldn't accept a position if the corporate culture were a poor fit for them.

At the same time, companies need to pay attention to how well a potential hire would fit in their workplace culture. Employees who don't feel the organization is a good match are the most likely to leave within a year, according to Robert Half research cited in this report. And, as managers know all too well, sudden departures are a drag on productivity, team morale and the budget.

How do you know if a candidate will fit your corporate culture? See the report for the questions you need to ask before you hire.

How appealing is your organizational culture?

What do current and former employees say about your workplace environment? Is it working for or against your recruitment and retention efforts? To help determine the quality of your organizational culture, ask yourself these eight questions:

    1
    Do job candidates often cite your company's culture as the reason for wanting to work there?
    2
    Can your employees easily and clearly describe how they contribute to the organization's strategic goals and bottom line?
    3
    Is there a buzz of positivity — even excitement — in your workplace?
    4
    Do workers feel safe and confident enough to express their honest opinions?
    5
    Do your employees constantly find new ways to improve processes and solve business problems?
    6
    Do staff and managers treat one another with respect and courtesy?
    7
    Is there a spirit of learning and continuous improvement in your workplace?
    8
    Do you have a low turnover rate?

Did you answer mostly ‘yes?’

Congratulations! Your workplace culture seems healthy.

 

Did you answer mostly ‘no?’

It may be time to revamp your company culture.

 
Doing little or nothing to make your company a place where people want to work all but guarantees that you will struggle to hire and retain the talent your business needs."
 
— Paul McDonald, senior executive director, Robert Half

4 ways to improve your organizational culture

Some organizations are finding out the hard way just how important workplace culture is today. But even if your company doesn't have a cutthroat corporate culture, it never hurts to take a closer look at how you engage with employees.

Whether your organizational culture needs a little touch-up or a major overhaul, you can do these four things — not quarterly or annually, but every day.

Open lines of communication.

Let staff know you have their back.

Show your appreciation.

Invest in employees' professional development.

See the full report for more tips and information on how to apply them in your workplace.